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Full text of "Jan Müller, 1922-1958"

Property of 
The Hilla von Rebay Foundation 



©, The Solomon R. Gu gg enhei m Foundation, Ne W York Library of Congress Card Catalogue Number 62-12622 Printed in the United States of America 



TRUSTERS 



HARKV F. (il'fiGEMI Kl M. I'KESIDKNT 



AI.HKKT K. THIEI.K, VICE I'KENIDKNT 



H. H. AKNASON, VICE 1'KESI I> EXT, ART ADMINISTRATION 



THE COt'NTKSS CASTLE STEWART 



MRS. HARRY E. OUGGENHEIM 



A. CHAUNCET NEWLIN 



MRS. HENRY OHRE 



MISS HII. I. A REBAY, DIRECTOR EMERITI'S 



I>ANI EI. CATTOX RICH 



MICHAEL I'. WKTTACII 



MEDLEY (i. H. WHELI'LKY 



CARL ZIOROSSEH 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 



http://archive.org/details/janmllerOOsolo 



Generous assistance has been received horn numerous institutions and individuals in the preparation of this exhibition. 
Special gratitude is extended to the following: 



IIMMIts OF WORKS OK AIIT 

Mr. and Mrs. William Ash, New York 
Richard Brown Baker, New York 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Flavin, New York 
Willard Golovin, New \<>rl; 
Mr. and Mrs. Kermit Lansner. New York 
Dr. I'aul Lariviere, Montreal 
Mr. and Mrs. Conrad J. Moss. Los Angeles 
Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York- 
Horace Richter, New York- 
Alma Schapiro. New York 
Mrs. Margaret Silberman. New York- 
Horace Richter Collection, The Mint Museum of Art, North Carolina 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York 



l.l-.MH IIS OF < Ol Oil PLATES 

Arts Magazine, New York 

The Museum of Modern Art, New York 

TIME Magazine, New York 



The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston has kindly made available the results of its previous research 

and has undertaken to collaborate in Jan Miiller's first museum exhibition 

by presenting a major portion of it in Boston from mid-March through April 1962. 



Miss Anne L. Jenks assisted in the planning of the exhibition and is responsible for the documentary section in the catalogue. 
Mrs. Jan Miiller has given invaluable guidance throughout and supplied the written account of the artist's life. 
Richard Bellamy, in his capacity as Director of the Hansa Gallery, furnished important aid during the initial exhibition phase. 
Robert Frank- provided the photograph of Jan Miiller. 

Harry F. Guggenheim, President 




Jan Miiller. January 1958. 



,IAX MULLEH'S l,IFE BY DODY MULLER 



Jan Miiller was born in Hamburg. Germany, on December 27, 1922. He died 
on January 29, 1958, in New York City. 

In 1924, when Jan was one and one-half years old, his parents, Heinrich and 
Lisa, and his older sister Ruth, moved from Hamburg to Nuremberg for two years, and 
from there to Brandenburg, where Maren. his younger sister was born. In Brandenburg 
he attended school, which he disliked. He showed no exceptional interest in painting, 
although the family as a whole was artistic. But his feeling for life itself was intense and 
full of force. To run. to be in the sun. in the woods, to play on box cars in railroad yards, 
to be in street battles— all those strange games that are mysterious and forbidden to 
adults— were the childhood of Jan Miiller. 

Then, it was 1933. 

Hitler came to power. Jan's father was arrested. When friends had bribed his 
release, it was obvious that the parents could no longer remain active against the Nazis 
in Germany. At the end of 1933. Jan went with his family to Czechoslovakia and stayed 
in Prague for five months. The sudden influx of political refugees was a new but not 
uncommon phenomenon and the city was not able to cope with it. 

From Prague, his father went to France and Jan went with the rest of the family 
to Bex-Les-Bains in Switzerland. His mother took a teaching position at a boarding 
school, Ecole Nouvelle La Pelouse, which Jan and his sisters attended. There, thirteen 
years old. Jan had the first attack of rheumatic fever. 

In the summer of 1936. Jan. his mother and sisters went to Amsterdam. Two 
years later, in July 1938, he and his sister. Ruth, went to Paris. The second attack of 



rheumatic fever came and the recovery was slow and only partial. Afterwards, he at- 
tended school, he taught himself French and began to read a lot and to write poetry and 
essays. In May 1940. he was interned as a German refugee and sent to a camp near Lyons. 

Paris fell. In June 1940. France signed the Armistice with Germany. Jan was 
released from camp, and with Ruth moved to Ornaisons, near Narbonne in the south 
of France. Despite the difficulties and insecurities attending the journey, the south of 
France made so profound an impression on Jan that he later recalled it in his painting 
as radiant with light and beauty. The light of the south was to live in all his painting 
and he loved France dearly. 

In September of 1940. he went to Marseilles to try to obtain a visa to the United 
States. However, as he was of draft age and still considered German, he could not get 
an exit visa from France. Twice, he. Ruth and their father tried unsuccessfully to cross 
the Spanish frontier. Finally, in February 1941, at the third try, Jan and Ruth managed 
to get into Spain and traveling through Barcelona and Madrid, reached Lisbon, Portu- 
gal, where they joined their father. From there they left for the United States at six 
month intervals. Jan left Lisbon in the middle of May and arrived in New \ork on June 
3, 1941. Shortly thereafter, his mother and Maren were interned by the Nazis in Amster- 
dam. They were sent back to Germany where they were held until after the war. In New 
York. Jan began to teach himself English by spending hours reading in the public library. 
For the first time he read a translation of Faust. 

He settled immigration problems by going to Canada and re-entering the 
United States on a regular quota. Then he went to a work farm in Ohio to return even- 
tually to New York where he had jobs as a dishwasher, a day camp instructor, a laborer 
in a ball-point pen factory and a film cutter. None of these were of interest to him except 
as a means of livelihood. However, the experience of putting together the various frames 
of films required in film cutting was later to influence his use of "close-ups" and "long 
shots" in the triptychs and hanging pieces. He was intrigued by the movies and would 
spend much time there. The whole experience of paying for a ticket at the box office, 
entering the black movie house, the movies themselves, the people inside, was of endless 
fascination to him. 

Jan"s interest in politics continued for a while, but as his conviction in the moral 
and ethical issues of our times began to express itself in his art. he withdrew from active 
participation in political matters. 

In 1945. at the end of the war. Jan's mother and his sister. Maren. came to the 
United States. That same year he began to paint. First, he attended the Art Students 
League for six months and then he went to study with Hans Hof mann from 1945 to 1950. 
Although there were many arguments as a result of the widely diverse ideas that sep- 
arated pupil from teacher, he always maintained deep respect, admiration and sincere 
love for Hans Hofmann and for his work. 



Out of that period came an exhibition called 813 BROADWAY, in which the 
participants were Miles Forst, John Grillo, Lester Johnson, Felix Pasilis, Wolf Kahn 
and Jan. It was during this time and until 1953 that Jan painted in a mosaic style. From 
1954, his paintings became more figurative. 

In a sense, the 813 BROADWAY exhibition contained the rudiments of the 
Hansa Gallery which was to form on East 12th Street and which opened in the autumn 
of 1952. With Jan, such artists as Jean Follett, Barbara Forst. Miles Forst, Wolf Kahn. 
Allan Kaprow, Felix Pasilis and Richard Siankiewicz were among the founders. For 
the next six years. Jan was to have a show there each year. 

The summers of 1950, '51 and 52 were spent in Provincetown. Massachusetts, 
but by now, the damage done to his heart by the rheumatic fever and past deprivations 
could no longer be alla\ed. At that time. Jan had a loft on Broadway across from Grace 
Church. He then moved to Bond Street and in 1953 decided to undergo an operation 
to replace the damaged valve with a plastic one. It was assumed that the operation, if 
successful, would make him well. The operation took place in the spring of 1954. It 
was not successful, although this was not certain at the time. Also, the valve was audible 
which was most disconcerting to him. And yet, his major works were to be painted in 
the four years that remained to him. 

In the summer of 1955, Jan returned to Provincetown. He began the series of 
"path" paintings. They are straight paths, circular paths, double and single, some 
curved, some nearly blocked, but all leading to eternitv and to the sun. 

It was also in Provincetown. in 1956. that he married Dolores James. That 
summer he painted OF THIS TIME-OF THAT PLACE. HAMLET AND HORATIO 
and the WALPURGISNACHT-FAUST I. In the following autumn the couple moved 
to 342 Bowery where Jan was to paint the second FAUST and in the subsequent spring. 
THE TEMPTATION OF ST. ANTHONY. Although the paintings became stronger 
and his artistic convictions clearer, and although he was happier then, his health deteri- 
orated further. In this year and in those that followed, he never suffered less than four 
attacks each night. 

The summer of 1957 was again spent in Provincetown. In spite of another 
eight- week attack of rheumatic fever. Jan painted THE CONCERT OF ANGELS. THE 
SEARCH FOR THE UNICORN and THE GREAT HANGING PIECE. 

On December 30, 1957, he became a United States citizen. His sixth exhibition 
at the Hansa opened on January 6, 1958. Soon after, he was to begin the painting of 
the reverse theme of Jacob's Ladder— of Hell and Conformity. It remained unfinished, 
but it is all there, nevertheless. Jan did not fear physical death— but the horror in life, 
the Hell of conformity and spiritual death. But the spirit of life, the spirit of freedom, 
the freedom to search, and the faith— the faith beyond searching— are here in the witches, 
the angels, the paths, and the Man on the Horse. 




The Temptation of St. Anthony. 1957. Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 



JAN MILLERS AKT BY THOMAS M. MESSER 



The work of an artist of originality and power will always invite discussion, 
stimulate ideas and engage our intellect. Before allowing the play of ideas to unfold, 
there is, however, the work itself to be seen and to be secured within ourselves. 

The viewer's reaction comes first: a sense of largeness and of monumentally; 
a sense of apparition and of mystery; a sense of amorality and of purity: a sense, first 
of life and vitality, and then of fatality and death. 

Questions come thereafter: how did this painting evolve? from where did it 
draw its strength? how does it relate to broader currents? what did it achieve? 

The secpience of work is simple enough, brief as it is, spanning not more than 
ten years. Eclectic beginnings are followed by cubist exercises from about 1948 to 1950. 
Miiller's advanced apprenticeship in the abstract idiom is carried out in Hans Hofmann's 
workshop from 1950 to 1953. The decision to recreate subject matter through the use of 
an abstract vocabulary and. thereby, to break ranks in the Hofmann school comes in 
1953. Thereafter, gradually, in various stages, we witness the assertion of his own mas- 
tery. Jan Miiller. having used his abstract schooling to reconstitute the object in his paint- 
ing, now forms the new figurations within a context of philosophy, religion, mythology, 
and literature, without sacrificing to any of these the potent visual impact of his art. 

In the process of this development, the initial stress upon geometric order is 
abandoned in favor of free, organic form; his early concern with the structuring of 
the surface appears to give way to the exuberant demands of an expressive art; color, 
at first an object of experimentation, comes into its own. fully and jubilantly. In other 
words, the painter's strong romantic propensities, having been tempered by a self- 
imposed classic discipline, carry the day. 



Jan Miiller's painting is founded upon the unity of subject matter with form. In 
his mature period, the successful solution of formal problems is taken for granted and 
subject matter becomes the conscious determinant of his art. It is the subject that tests 
the successful development of his technical means and that is the measure of his inventive 
capacity. Through the subject. Muller evokes a spiritual dimension and a sense of the 
universal. By the essential identity of subject matter and of the formal solution, Miiller's 
art is decisively removed from the level of illustration and endowed with plastic sig- 
nificance. 

In his early, abstract phase. Muller builds his canvases with pure form and 
lets the non-objective order furnish the content and meaning of his art. Soon there- 
after, forms begin to arrange themselves in a way that clearly announces the figurative 
element in the making. Cautiously, almost as if engaging in forbidden games. Muller 
allows the recognizable motif to emerge from within the abstract pattern. First land- 
scape, then flower still-life and the figure are the results— with landscape offering itself 
as descriptive prose, still-life as lyric poetry and the figure foreshadowing an epos that 
is to become Miiller's crowning achievement. 

For his late epic phase— the phase of thematic subject matter— nothing less Is 
required than the great texts of world literature: The Bihle. Cervantes, Shakespeare, 
and Goethe, and specifically, the heroic passages in Genesis, Don Quixote. Hamlet, and 
Faust. Of these, the German poem provides the most potent literary stimulus for Miiller's 
contemporary vision. 

Two of his monumental works are devoted to the Faust legend. They are mis- 
leadingly entitled FAUST I and FAUST II, for both paintings reflect the romantic 
setting of the first part of the great dramatic poem. Muller is inspired by the medieval 
German scene and the cramped Gothic world. In works that derive from the Faust 
theme, he paints Mephisto, the old German Teufel, with his witches and hexes who 
appear fancifully arrayed or stark-naked, showing a bare-faced grimace or wearing 
a death-white mask, as they roam over the hills and dales of a bizarre landscape north 
of the Alps— shrieking, gesturing, and otherwise indecorously preoccupied, in the tumul- 
tuous orgy of a Walpurgisnacht. Demons and angels, heaven and hell, in their Goethian 
interpenetration emanate from Miiller's central Faust subject and inhabit other works 




♦ .-# w* 



Of This Time— Of That Place. 1956. Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 




The Search for the Unicorn. 1957. Collection Lariviere, Montreal. 



in which the mythological theme remains implicit. Such paintings as THE CONCERT 
OF ANGELS. THE VIRGINS or THE ACCUSATION are indicative of the centrifugal 
force which the imagery of Faust exerted throughout Miiller's subject matter. Finally, 
unnamed, but ubiquitous are THE MOTHERS. Goethe's Mutter, this awesome and 
awful archetype of life-bestowing, redeeming femininity which, in its angelic and ab- 
stracted transformation, as DAS EWIG-WEIBLICHE. concludes the poem of Faust. 

To establish Miiller's specific contribution, we might well ask ourselves what 
he has done that others have not. To answer we must begin with Eugene Delacroix, per- 
haps the last of the great 19th century masters with whom literature remained at the 
source of painting. After Delacroix, in a main line that continues until the First World 
War. painting is exposed, in one sense, to a successive purification and, in another, to a 
parallel impoverishment. 

With Courbet and Cezanne, painting freed itself from its literary source and. 
as the cliche goes, "ceased to be the hand-maiden of literature ". The theme was aban- 
doned in favor of the object. As Picasso and the cubists proceeded with their attenua- 
tions, dissections and fragmentations, the object, in turn, was abandoned in favor of 
form that is free from all but itself. The audacious steps taken by the pioneers of modern 
painting led to the geometric solution of a Mondrian. Between the two wars, surrealism 
and the art of fantasy, re-established contact with the object but did so in terms that 
stood apart from the sequence here considered. Miiller's point of departure, therefore, 
remained pure form— Mondrian's legacy. This he received from Hans Hofmann. his 
teacher, who relayed it with such enrichments as the years, the expressionist tradition 
and Hofmann's own vital artistry had given it. 

When, in the early 1950's. Miiller begins to question the sufficiency of an 
esthetic of pure form, the idiom of abstract expressionism had already revealed its 
representational potential. The late Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. David 
Park and Elmer Bischoff and possibly others had either approached, returned to or 
skirted the borderline of the recognizable. When, therefore. Miiller moves toward rep- 



reservation, he is neither first, nor is he alone. His decisive contribution must not be 
sought in his neo-figurative participation, but in the re-integration of the figurative with 
literature and mythology. 

By readopting literary subject matter and by realigning it with the formal exi- 
gencies of contemporary art. Midler re-emphasized an aspect of painting that had all 
but disappeared in our time. To be sure, the religious theme appeared frequently in the 
work of the earlier twentieth century masters, and one thinks in particular of Emil Nolde 
from whom Miiller inherited certain expressive devices. But in their thematic painting, 
Nolde and other German Expressionists stayed, for the most part, within a territory 
defined at one end by purely Biblical motifs and at the other by a religiously predicated 
private myth. Miiller. on the other hand, appears to have reached past such recent pro- 
totypes for a romantic source. In this sense, he returns to the creative sphere of 
Eugene Delacroix. 

But questions remain: first, if the entire strength of modern inventiveness has 
been marshalled to set painting free from presumably encumbering fetters, if every 
effort has been bent tow aid the establishment of an artistic independence from literature 
and from the object, why then is the restitution of these components an asset rather than 
a mere return to a discarded ideal? The answer must state that Midler's work marks a 
return only in one sense, and that a seeming backward motion is balanced by an onward 
movement which secures his placement with today's advanced guard. 

Then, lastly, if we admit his work in terms of original innovation, and in terms 
of stylistic uniqueness, does this suffice? Is it enough in art. to have found something 
new. to have done what others have not. to be leading, or to be alone? Again, one would 
reply in a qualified negative and conclude that excellence, while often reaching toward 
the unexplored, does not attach itself necessarily to the new. 

The substance of Midler's painting cannot, therefore, be assessed in terms of 
old or new but must be sought in the work itself. We find it in Jan Midler's strong and 
earnest art. 



uniiks i\ the i;\ini:iiiii\ 



Work- are lifted, as nearly as possible, in chronological sequence. 



SEATED NUDE MODEL, c. 1950-51. Charcoal. 24% x 19". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

SEATED NUDE MODEL— ABSTRACTION, c. 1950-51. Charcoal, 25 x 19". 
Lent by -Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

LINEAR ABSTRACTION OF MODEL, c. 1950-51. Charcoal, 25 % x 19%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

MOUNTAINOUS ISLAND, c. 1951. Oil on cotton, 39% x 39%". 
Collection Willard Golovin, New York. 

SELF PORTRAIT, c. 1952. Gouache, 23% x 18 '4". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

THE ROBE. c. 1952. Oil on cotton mounted on pressed wood, 74 x 77%". 
Collection Mr. and Mrs. Conrad J. Moss. Los Angeles. 

CROSS MOSAIC. 1953. Oil on wood. 25% x 31%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

SEATED FIGURES. 1953. Oil on canvas, 54 x 49%". 

Horace Richter Collection. The Mint Museum of Art. Charlotte. North Carolina. 

NUDES AT PROVENCE. 1953. Oil on canvas. 48 x 36". 

Horace Richter Collection. The Mint Museum of Art. Charlotte. North Carolina. 

BIG NUDES, MOSAIC BACKGROUND. 1953. Oil on canvas, 55 % x 89%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

THE RIENZI LANDSCAPE. 1953. Oil on canvas, 30 x 61 Va". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

BACCHANALE-ADAM AND EVE. 1953. Oil on canvas. 70 x 76". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

THE HERALDIC GROUND. 1953. Oil on burlap. 14% x 40%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

AFTERNOON OF SPRING. 1954. Oil on canvas. 65% x 75". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

WHITE NUDES IN LANDSCAPE. 1954. Oil on wood. 8 x 15". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

BACCHANALE AND PHANTOM HORSE. 1954-55. Oil on canvas. 52 x 70". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

SELF PORTRAIT. NO. 2. 1955. Oil on board. 25% x 19%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 



BACCHAN ALE. 1955. Oil on canvas, 76V4 x 71%". 

Horace Richter Collection, The Mint Museum of \ri. Charlotte, North < larolina. 

LEAPFROG. 1955. Oil on canvas, 37% \ 41%". 

Horace Richter Collection, The Mini Museum of Art, ( lharlotte, North ( larolina. 

GREEN GROVE. 1955. Oil on canvas. 15% x 18". 
Collection Mr. and Mrs. Kermit Lansner. New York. 

SINGLE EQUESTRIAN. 1955. Oil on board, 22% x 18%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

THE GREAT TRIPTYCH. 1955. Oil on canvas. 59% x 118%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

LANDSCAPE WITH HOUSES, PROVINCETOWN. 1955-56. Oil on w I. 7% x 11%". 

Private collection. New York. 

DOUBLE CIRCULAR PATH, NO. 1. 1955-56. Oil on burlap, 38 x 42". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

DOUBLE PATH OF DECISION. 1955-56. Oil on canvas, 19 : 's x 67%". 
Collection Mr. and Mrs. William Ash. New York. 

SINGLE CIRCULAR PATH. 1955-56. Oil on canvas. 38 x 50". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

TRIUMPH l\ THE SUN. 1956. Oil on paper mounted on canvas, 38 x 47%". 
Horace Richter Collection. The Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

OF THIS TIME-OF THAT PLACE. 1956. Oil on canvas, 49% x 95%". 
Lent by -Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

STUDY FOR OF THIS TIME— OF THAT PLACE. 1956. Oil on wood. 7% x 9%". 
Private collection, New York. 

TRIPTYCH OF PROVENCE THEMES. 1956. Oil on wood, 12% x 32%". 
Horace Richter Collection. The Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte. North Carolina. 

WALPURCISNACHT FAUST I. 1956. Oil on canvas. 68 x 119%". 
Collection The .Museum of Modern Art. New Yuk. 

FAUST PANELS. 1956. Oil on wood. 13% x 46V 4 ". 
Collection Horace Richter. New York. 

HAMLET AND HORATIO. NO. 1. 1956. Oil on canvas, 50% x 18%". 
Collection Richard Brown Baker. New York. 

AFTERNOON FLOWERS. 1956. Oil on canvasboard, 9% x 7%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan -Miiller, New York. 

FLOWER.SOFPASSION.NO. 1. 1956. Oil on plywood, 9% \ l%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

FLOWERS OF PASSION, NO. 2. 1956. Oil on pl> wood, 9% x 4%". 

Lent In Mis. Jan Miiller, New York. 

SEATED NUDE. 1956. Oil and tempera on pressed wood. 7 3 4 x 8%". 
Collection Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Flavin, New York. 



\\ VLPURGISNACHT- F VUST II. L956. Oil on canvas, 82 x 120V. 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

ALL LIVING THINGS. 1957. Oil on canvas, 15 x 1<> ". 
Private collection, New Y>rk. 

THE TEMPTATION OF ST. ANTHONY. 1957. Oil en canvas, 80% x 121". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

THE CONCERT OF ANGELS. 1957. Oil on canvas. 56% x 148". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

SIX PIECES—ABSTRACT MOSAIC. 1957. Oil on wood, 25V high. 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

DODY'S FACES. 1957. Oil on wood, 23" high. 
Lent by Mr-. Jan Miiller. New York. 

THE TRYSTING PLACE. NO. 1. 1957. Oil on canvas. 32 x 31V 4 ". 
Collection Mrs. Margaret Silberman. New York. 

THE GREAT HANGING PIECE. 1957. Oil on wood, 80V high. 

Collection Horace Richter. New Y>rk. 

THE SEARCH FOR THE UNICORN. 1957. Oil on canvas. 70% x 93%". 
Collection Lariviere. -Montreal. 

CONCERT TRIPTYCH. 1957. Oil on wood, 1 1 :i -i x 47". 
Private collection. New York. 

LOST BALL SERIES: SEARCH FOR THE BALL. NO. 1. 1957. Oil on canvasboard, 9 x 12". 
Lent b\ Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

LOST BALL SERIES: SEARCH FOR THE BALL. NO. 2. 1957. Oil on canvasboard, 9 x 12". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

LOST BALL SERIES: SEARCH FOR THE BALL, NO. 3. 1957. Oil on canvasboard. 9 x 12". 
Collection Alma Schapiro, New Y>rk. 

LOST BALL SERIES: PHANTOM RIDERS. 1957. Oil on canvasboard, 9 x 12". 
Horace Richter Collection. The -Mint Museum of Art. Charlotte. North Carolina. 

LOST BALL SERIES : TWILIGHT COMES ON THE SEARCH. 1957. Oil on canvasboard. 9 x 12" 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

THE VIRGINS. 1957. Oil on canvas. 48 x 75%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

VIRGINS— PASTEL. 1957. Pa-lel on board. 11% x 1 l%". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 

COMMUNAL FLOWERS. 1957. Pastel on board,9x8". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

THE ACCUSATION. 1957. Oil on canvas. 18 x 50". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 

JACOB'S LADDER. 1958. Oil on canvas, 83% x 115". 
Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 




The Robe. c. V)52. Collection Mr. and Mrs. Conrad J. Moss, Los Angele 




The Heraldic Ground. 1953. Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New \c>rk. 




Don Me Path of Decision. 1955-56. Collection Mr. and Mrs. William Ash. New York. 




Walpurgisnacht— Faust II. V)r>f>. Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 




The Concert of Angels. 1957. Lent by -Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 




The Virgins. 1957. Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller. New York. 




Jacob's Ladder. 1958. Lent by Mrs. Jan Miiller, New York. 



DOCUMENTATION 



o>e-m.\> i:\hihitio\s 



1953 March 16— April 2 

1954 March 22— April 3 

1955 April 12— May 1 
August 8-15 

1956 February 6-22 
July 

1957 January 2-19 

1958 January 6-25 

1958-59 December 15— January 10 

1960 September 12— October 20 

1961 March 27— April 75 



Hansa Gallery, New York 

Hansa Gallery, New York 

Hansa Gallery, New York 

The Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts 

Hansa Gallery, New York 

The Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts 

Hansa Gallery, New York 

Hansa Gallery, New York 

Hansa Gallery, New York 

The University Gallery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 

Zabriskie Gallery. New York 



rillXIIMI, l.HOI r EXHIBITIONS 



7957 873 Broadway 

1951 Expansionists 

1952 Group Exhibition of all Members 

1955 Rising Talent 

1956 Stable Show: 1956: Fifth Annual Exhibition of 
Painting and Sculpture 

1956 12 Painters 

1957 Young America 1957 

1957 The New York School : second generation 

1957 6th New York Artists' Annual Exhibition 

1957 Society for Contemporary American Art 

1957 The Fourth International Art Exhibition of Japan 

1957 

1957 Second Generation of the Neiv York School 

1957 Painting and Sculpture Acquisitions 

1957 1957 Annual Exhibition 

1958 New Talent in the USA 1958 

1958 Exhibition of Paintings: 11th Annual Creative 

Art Program 

1958 Festivals of Tiro Worlds 

1958 The 1958 Pittsburgh Bicentennial International 
Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture 

1959 An Exhibition of Contemporary Painting 
1959 100 Works on Paper: 1. United States 

1959 New Images of Man 

1960 The Horace Richter Collection: Contemporary 
American Painting and Sculpture 

I960 The Image Lost and Found 

I960 The Figure in Contemporary American Painting 



813 Broadway, New York 

House of Duveen, New York 

Hansa Gallery, New \i>rk 

The University Gallery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 

Stable Gallery, New York 

The Sun Gallery. Provincetown, Massachusetts 

ff hitney Museum of American Art, New York 

The Jewish Museum. New \ork 

Stable Gallery, New York 

The Art Institute of Chicago 

The Mainichi Newspapers, Tokyo: American section organized by the Department 

of Circulating Exhibitions. The Museum of Modern Art. New York 

The HCE Gallery, Provincetown. Massachusetts 

Felix Landau Gallery, Los Angeles 

The Museum of Modern Art, New York 

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York 

Circulating exhibition organized by The American Federation of Arts, New York 

University of Colorado, Boulder 
Spoleto. Italy 

Department of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute. Pittsburgh 

Exhibition sponsored by the Richmond Artists' Association, Richmond, Virginia 

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston 

The Museum of Modern Art. New York 

T/ic Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina 

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston 

Circulating exhibition organized by the American Federation of Arts, New York 



i:ii:mim; litem 



IX II I It I II «» > CATALO ii V I X 

House of Duveen, New York. Expansionists, 1951, ill. 

University Gallery, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis. Rising Talent, 1955. 

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Young America 1957 : Thirty American Painters and Sculptors under thirty-five, 
1957. ill. (Statement by the artist I. 

The Jewish Museum, New York. The New York School : second generation, 1957, ill. 

The Mainichi Newspapers. Tokyo. The Fourth International Art Exhibition of Japan, 1957. ill. (American section organized by 
the Department of Circulating Exhibitions, The Museum of Modern Art. New \ork). 

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. 79.57 Annual Exhibition : Sculpture • Paintings • Watercolors, 1957. 

Universit) of Colorado, Boulder. Exhibition of Paintings: 11th Annual Creative Arts Program. 1958. ill. 

Department of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute. Pittsburgh. The 1958 Pittsburgh Bicentennial International Exhibition of 
Contemporary Painting and Sculpture. 1958. ill. 

Hansa Gallery, New York. Jan Muller [1958]. 

The .Museum of Modern Art. New York. New Images of Man, 1959, 4 ill. ( Statements by the artist I. 

The Mint Museum of Art. Charlotte, North Carolina. The Horace Richter Collection: Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, 1960, 2 il 

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. The Image Lost and Found. 1960. ill. 

Zabriskie Gallery, New York. Jan Muller: watercolors and gouaches: 1950-54. 1961, 2 ill. 



PERIODICALS 

"813 Broadway" (Christmas Shopping in New York Galleries). The Art Digest, v. 26. December 15. 1951. p. 17. 

J.F. "The Expansionists" (Fifty-Seventh Street in Review), The Art Digest, v. 26. January 1. 1952. p. 20. 21. 

F.P. "Jan Muller" ( News and Previews ). Art News, v. 52, March 1953, p. 55. 

I). \. -Jan Muller" ( 57th Street I. Art Digest, v. 27. April 1, 1953. p. 20, 24. 

K.I.L. "Sketches and Drawings" ( Reviews and Previews ). Art News, v. 52. January 1954. p. 70. 

Newbill. Al. "Abstraction in Three Stages," Art Digest, v. 28. March 15. 1954. p. 18. 

F.P. "Jan Miiller" ( Reviews and Previews), Art News, v. 53, April 1954, p. 47, 53. 

M.S. "Jan Muller" ( Fortnight in Review), Arts Digest, v. 29, April 15, 1955, p. 20. 

F.L. "Jan Muller" (Reviews and Previews), Art News, v. 54, May 1955, p. 51, 56. 

He". Thomas B. "U.S. Painting: Some Recent Directions," Art News Annual, v. 25. 1956, p. 199. 

L.C. "Jan Miiller" (Reviews and Previews), Art News, v. 54, February 1956, p. 51, ill. 

R.R. "Jan Muller" ( One-Man shows ). Arts, v. 30. February 1956, p. 58. 

La Farge. Henry A. "Art News of the Year," Art News Annual, v. 26, 1957, p. 180. ill. 

Frankfurter. Alfred. "The Voyages of Dr. Caligari through time and space," Art News, v. 55. January 1957. p. 31. 65. 

M.S. "Jan Miiller" (In the Galleries), Arts, v. 31, January 1957, p. 51. ill. 

Seckler, Dorothy Gees. "Americans with a Future," Art in America, v. 45. March 1957, p. 60, ill. 

"The Younger Generation." Time. v. 69. .March 11, 1957. p. 82. col. ill. (Statement by the artist ). 

Hess, Thomas B. "Younger Artists and the unforgivable crime." Art Neivs, v. 56. April 1957. p. 49, 64. ill. 

J. A. "Jan Muller" (Reviews and Previews ), Art News, v. 56, January 1958. p. 16, 17. ill. 



A.V. "'Jan Miiller" I In the Galleries), Arts, v. 32, January 1958, p. 53. ill. 

Arnason. H. H. "New Talent in the U.S.," Art in America, v. 46, Spring 1958. p. 16, 2 ill. 

'"This Summer in Spoleto," Art News, v. 57, June 1958, p. 41. 

"Painting and Sculpture Acquisitions," The Museum of Modern Art Bulletin, v. 25, no. 4. July 1958, p. 23. ill. 

L.C. "Jan Miiller" (Reviews and Previews), Art News, v. 57, December 1958. p. 16. ill. 

Sawin, Martica. "New York Letter," Art International, v. Ill, nos. 1-2, 1959, p. 45. 

Sawin, Martica. "Jan Miiller: 1922-1958." Arts, v. 33, February 1959. pp. 38-45. 9 ill. 

Lanes, Jerrold. "Brief Treatise on Surplus Value or. The Man Who Wasn't There." Arts, v. 34. November 1959. p. 30. 33, ill. 

"New Images of Man," The Studio, v. 159. February 1960, p. 53. ill. 

Rudikoff. Sonya. "Images in Painting," Arts, v. 34, June 1960, p. 41, 42, 45. ill. 

L.C. "Jan Miiller" (7 shows for spring '61 ). Art News, v. 60, April 1961, p. 47. 60, ill. 

L.S. "Jan Miiller" (In the Galleries), Arts, v. 35, April 1961, p. 51. ill. 

Fussiner, Howard. "The Use of Subject Matter in Recent Art," The Art Journal, v. 20, Spring 1961, p. 134, 137, ill. 

Ashton, Dore. "Jan Miiller" (New York Notes), Art International, v. V, no. 4, May 1, 1961. p. 81. ill. 



Ill I'ltl IIONx 



Mountainous Island, c. 1951 

House of Duveen, New York. Expansionists (exhibition catalogue), 1951 . 

Portrait of a Man, c. 1952 

Arts, v.. 35, April 1961, p. 51. 

Zabriskie Gallery, New York. Jan Miiller: watercolors and gouaches: 1950-54 (exhibition catalogue), 1961, no. 8. 

Art International, v. V, no. 4, May 1, 1961, p. 81. 

Three Quarter Head of a Girl, c. 1952 

Hansa Gallery, New York. Recent Paintings: Jan Miiller (exhibition notice) [1954]. detail. Art News, v. 60, April 1961. \>. 47 
Zabriskie Gallery, New York. Jan Miiller: watercolors and gouaches: 1950-54 (exhibition catalogue). 1961. no. II. 

Bacchanale — Adam and Ere, 1953 

The Jewish Museum, New York. The New York School : second generation, 1957, no. 36. 

The Heraldic Ground, 1953 

Arts, v. 33, February 1959, p. 38. 

The Museum of Modern Art, New York. New Images of Man, 1959, p. 106. 

The Studio, v. 157, February I960, p. 51. 

Bacchanale and Phantom Horse, 1954-55 

Art News, v. 54, February 1956, p. 51. 

Bacchanale, 1955 

Art News Annual, v. 26, 1956, p. 177. 

Hansa Gallery, New York. Paintings: Jan Miiller (exhibition notice) [7956]. 

The Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina. The Horace Richter Collection: Contemporary Painting and 

Sculpture [1960], p. 11, no. 66. 

Cthonic Bacchanale, 1955 

Arts, v. 33, February 1959, p. 39. 



Double Circular Path, 1955-56 

Arts, v. 33, February 1959. p. 41. 

Double Path of Decision, 1955-56 

Art Neivs, v. 56, April 1957, p. 46. 

Of This Time— Of That Place. 1956 

Art in America, v. 45, March 1957, p. 59. 

Art Students League News, v. 10, March 1957, p. 3. 

Time Magazine, v. 69, March 11. 1957. p. 83 (col). 

W'alpurgisnacht — Faust I, 1956 

Arts, v. 31, January 1957, p. 51. 

Hansa Gallery, New York. Recent Paintings: Jan Miiller (exhibition notice) [1957]. 

The Museum of Modern Art Bulletin, v. 25, no. 4, 1958. p. 16. 

Arts, v. 33, February 1959, p. 42, 43. 

Hamlet and Horatio, No. 1, 1956 

Arts, v. 34, November 1959, p. 33. 

The Museum of Modern Art, New York. New Images of Man, 1959, p. 110. 

The Art Journal, v. 20, Spring 1961. p. 135. 

W'alpurgisnacht — Faust II, 1956 

Art News, v. 55, January 1957, p. 28. 

The Mainichi Newspapers. Tokyo. The Fourth International Art Exhibition of Japan. 1957 (American section organized by 

the Department of Circulating Exhibitions, The Museum of Modern Art, New York), n.p. 
Art in America, v. 46, Spring 1958. p. 16. 

Portrait of E. Bernald, 1956 

Art in America, v. 46, Winter 1958-59. p. 29 (col). 

The Temptation of St. Anthony, 1957 
Arts, v. 32, January 1958, p. 53. 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. New Images of Man, 1959, p. 109 (col). 

The Concert of Angels, 1957 

Art News, v. 56, January 1958, p. 16. 

Concert Triptych. 1957 

Arts, v. 33. February 1959, p. 40. 

The Trysting Place, No. 2, 1957 

Arts, v. 33, February 1959, p. 41. 

The Great Hanging Piece, 1957 

Hansa Gallery, New York. Paintings: Jan Miiller (exhibition notice). January 1958. 

Art in America, v. 46, Spring 1958, p. 16. 

Arts, v. 33, February 1959, p. 44. 

The Museum of Modern Art, New York. New Images of Man. 1959, p. 108. 

The Search for the Unicorn, 1957 

Arts, v. 33. February 1959. p. 41 (col). 
Arts Yearbook 3, 1959, p. 78 (col). 

The Lost Ball, 1957 

Art News, v. 57, December 1958, p. 16. 

The Virgins. 1957 

Department of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. The 1958 Pittsburgh Bicentennial Internationa! Exhibition of 
Contemporary Painting and Sculpture. 1958, pi. 4. 

Les Girls, 1957 

The Mint Museum of Art. Charlotte, \orth Carolina. The Horace Richter Collection: Contemporary Painting and 
Sculpture [I960], p. 11, no. 76. 

The Accusation, 1957 

University of Colorado, Boulder. Exhibition of Paintings: 11th Annual Creative Arts Program, 1958. n.p. 

Arts, v. 34, June 1960, p. 45. 

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. The Image Lost and Found. I960, p. 44. 

Jacob's Ladder, 1958 

Arts, v. 33, February 1959, p. 41. 



STAFF 



Director 
Administrative Assistant 

Curator of Education 
Assistant Curator 

Public Relations 

Membership 

Registrar 

Conservation 

Photography 



Thomas M. Messer 
Sheila More Ogden 

Louise Averill Svendsen 
Daniel Robbins 

Peter Pollack 

Donna Butler 

Arlene B. Del lis 

Orrin Riley and Saul Fuerstein 

Robert E. Mates 



Business Administrator 
Building Superintendent 
Head Guard 



Glenn H. Easton. Jr. 
Peter G. Loggin 
John J . Teeling 



Exhibition '62/1 January 11— February 25, 1962 

2,000 copies of this catalogue, designed by Herbert Matter, 

have been printed by Sterlip Press, Inc. 

in January 1962 

for the Trustees of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 

on the occasion of the exhibition 

"Jan Muller: 1922—1958"